Friday, September 15, 2006

Pro Hypocrisy

Does it strike anyone else as hypoctytical that fanatical Pro-Lifers are also usually Pro-Death Penalty, and quite often also Pro-Guns?

Just asking.

7 comments:

Philippe Roy said...

See I think it's rather simple Lou, here's how it goes:

Pro-life: so a higher rate babies are born into poverty and grow up as criminals to avenge their mother's rape.

Pro-death Penalty: so we can hang those darn criminals - just in case we're the ones that committed the rape in the first place!

Pro-guns: well, we obviously need guns to give ourselves a reason to hang those criminals, or else why the hell would we give them the right to be born in the first place?!

PS. this is to be taken with a twisted sense of humous and a big big chunk'o'salt

LondonMisfit said...

I guess they're just all round positive people ;-)

Mia said...

I'm with phil on this one. Plus their bumper stickers are always good for a laugh.

Louise said...

I always wanted to make a bumper sticker saying: "I believe in Cheeses"- When you say it, it sounds just like Jesus, and really, cheese is heavenly to me.

In fact we used to substitute "cheeses" for "Jesus" in hymns at mass when we were kids, no-one ever noticed.

"What a friend we have in cheeee-ses..." try it, go on!

Mia said...

Oh praise to cheeses! I love cheese...from my head to my knees. Can I hear an amen and a praise the gouda?

I wont however sub the word cheeses for jesus around my Roman Catholic dad. I once made a joke during holy week when the local station was playing one of those religious movies. As they were nailing him to the cross I yelled out OUCH I should've worn boots! OMG the man almost killed me! Who knew a former altar boy could run like that?

Lynnbee said...

Hmm. I wouldn't call myself a hypocrite, but I also have reasons for believing in what I do. I'm not sure that goes for others, though.

Louise said...

If you truly believe in what you do then it's not hypocritical, it's your template for life, not mine.

We should all be able to believe our own convictions, so long as they don't impose on others.